Verify HTTPS enabled CM Management Points with PowerShell

On a normal Management point it is pretty straight forward to test if the management point is working by browsing to these addresses: http://<mp_server_name>/sms_mp/.sms_aut?mplisthttp://<mp_server_name>/sms_mp/.sms_aut?mpcert But if you try to do that on a HTTPS-enabled management point as a normal user you will get an error with access denied. This is because the CM client uses […]

Continue reading >

Back to Basics – ConfigMgr Distribution Points and Boundaries

Per request from a fellow tweep, here is crash course in ConfigMgr Distribution Points, Boundaries, and Boundary Groups. Distribution Points In ConfigMgr environments, the Distribution Points, or DPs, are simply there to store packages that client connects to for downloading software like applications, software updates, and OS deployment images etc.. To make sure clients are […]

Continue reading >

Hydration Kit For Windows Server 2019, SQL Server 2017 and ConfigMgr Current Branch

This Kit builds a complete ConfigMgr v1606/1610 with Windows Server 2016 and SQL Server 2016 SP1 infrastructure, and some (optional) supporting servers. This kit is tested on both Hyper-V and VMware virtual platforms, but should really work on any virtualization platform that can boot from an ISO. The kit offers a complete setup of both a primary site server running ConfigMgr Current Branch v1606 (server CM01), as well as a primary site server running ConfigMgr Technical Preview Branch v1610 (server CM02). You also find guidance on upgrading these platform to the latest build.

Continue reading >

Building the Perfect Windows Server 2019 Reference Image

Here is a step-by-step quick guide on building the perfect Windows Server 2016 reference image. This guide is divided in two parts: The first part covers how to create a Windows Server 2016 reference image in just a few minutes using offline servicing. The quick-and-dirty method. The second part is about creating a Windows Server 2016 reference image using MDT 8443. The SHINY method.

Continue reading >

You get what you pay for – Using NVMe disks in a lab

In my personal labs, and in our classroom labs, we’ve been using Samsung NVMe SSD Pro and Evo disks (950/960/070) for many years with good result. But when Amazon announced a dang good deal, moneywise, just before Christmas, on Crucial NVMe SSD’s (the CT1000P1SSD8 – Crucial P1 1TB 3D NAND NVMe PCIe M.2 SSD), I could not stop myself and asked my manager to order 15 of them, so we could upgrade the remaining classroom hosts from 512 GB to 1 TB. Shiny idea, right?

Continue reading >
Page 3 of 23
>